In this simulation, you will be given a briefing about the effects of the nuclear explosion on Hiroshima and the potential effects of most modern nuclear bombs; and the nuclear arsenals of the US and the other nuclear powers.

Arms Control Treaties with Russia
You are given a briefing about arms control treaties between the US and Russia, including the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. You will evaluate arguments for and against continuing to have arms control treaties with Russia, and asked:

Arms Control Treaties with Russia Policymaking Simulation
  • whether to continue to have arms control treaties with Russia
Arms Control Treaties

 

New START Treaty
You are given a briefing about the New START Treaty, and are presented a proposal to extend that Treaty. You will evaluate arguments for and against that policy, and will be asked:

New START Treat Policymaking Simulation
  • whether to agree to extend the New START Treaty that limits US and Russian strategic weapons and requires extensive inspections and information sharing
New START Treaty

 

INF Treaty
You are given a briefing about the INF Treaty, and the US withdrawal from it. After evaluating arguments for and against the Treaty, and you will be asked whether you approve or disapprove of US withdrawal:

INF Treaty Policymaking Simulation
  • starting the six month process of withdrawing from the INF Treaty, and if the Russians do not make the changes the U.S. seeks, withdraw from the Treaty, or stay within the INF Treaty and redouble efforts to work with the Russians to address concerns of both sides
INF Treaty

 

Minimum Retaliatory Capability
You are given a briefing about a nuclear arsenal that has minimum retaliatory capability. You will evaluate arguments for and against having a nuclear arsenal with minimum retaliatory capability, and will be asked whether you favor or oppose the US having that type of nuclear arsenal:

Minimum Retaliatory Capability Policymaking Simulation
  • having, at a minimum, enough nuclear weapons that could not be destroyed by an all-out surprise nuclear attack, so that the U.S. could always retaliate with a major nuclear strike.
  • how many nuclear weapons the US needs to have to survive an all-out nuclear attack and could then be used for retaliation
U.S. Nuclear Arsenal

 

First Use of Nuclear Weapons
You are given a briefing about the idea of first-use policies and the US’ current stance, and are presented two proposals for changing the US’ first-use stance. You will evaluate arguments for and against each proposal, and asked:

First Use of Nuclear Weapons Policymaking Simulation
  • whether the US should explicitly declare that it would consider using nuclear weapons first and state what kinds of non-nuclear attacks would prompt the US to consider doing so
  • whether the US should continue to be ambiguous, by not stating whether the US would consider using nuclear weapons first
  • whether the US should explicitly declare that the US will never use nuclear weapons first
  • whether President should be required to consult with Congress and have Congress issue of declaration of war on the country to be attacked before the President can use a nuclear weapon first
First Use of Nuclear Weapons

 

Land-Based Missiles
You will receive a briefing about land-based missiles and the US’ current plan to replace their land-based missiles by 2030, and are presented two proposals to phase-out land-based missiles with cost savings for each. After evaluating arguments for and against each proposal, you are asked which proposal you favor, including the current plan:

Land-Based Missiles Policymaking Simulation
  • Replacing the US’ land-based nuclear missiles by building new ones
  • Phasing out land-based missiles and increase the number of warheads to 1,550 (saving $120 billion)
  • Phasing out land-based missiles and keep the number of warheads at 1,150 (saving $140 billion)
Land-Based Missiles

 

Nuclear Testing
You are given a briefing about the moratorium on nuclear testing, and told that the US administration has agreed to abide the moratorium but remains the right to test if necessary. You are asked:

Nuclear Testing Policymaking Simulation
  • whether you approve of continuing to abide by the moratorium on nuclear testing
  • whether, in this hypothetical scenario, the US should or should not break the moratorium developing and testing the new type of weapon, breaking the moratorium against testing nuclear weapons
Nuclear Weapons Testing

 

Full Survey on Nuclear Weapons Policy (43 Questions)